Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Analysing the needs of university based information professionals: making personal learning and professional development meaningful.

Research Applications in Information and Library Studies 2012
University of South Australia

This paper reflects on the linear ‘career progression’ model of industry specific and organisational continuing professional development (CPD) programs. We propose to extend and innovate current developments in Personal Learning Network (PLN) models through the consideration of non-traditional, informal professional development activities.

Formal professional development programs are endorsed by both institutional employers and professional organisations in the Library and Information (LIS) sector. Drawing on previous research into LIS PD programs (Brooker 2010, Dalby 2008) we argue that these programs are delivered top-down and reflect a linear based career progression model. More recently PLNs have been suggested as alternatives or enhancements to these formal PD programs (Howlett 2011, Bennett 2010). However, these alternative models are still focused on career progression and measuring ‘success’ in a professional context.

This paper reports on an experimental case study undertaken to interrogate the efficacy of a formal LIS industry PD program in addressing the CPD needs of university based information professionals. A modified PLN model was used to critically reflect on a series of examples (activism, community engagement and personal practice) which trouble the traditional scope of these formal programs. We argue that these examples, whilst not part of a formal (or informal) professional development program, reflect the passion and pleasure that information professionals develop through their study and work practices. These examples take place outside of the formal programs, without recognition, and enable a space for critical reflection and innovative application.

not presenting but want to come open fields?

we’re really excited about people coming to open fields who aren’t in a formal ‘presenter’ role – it’s all about engagement and participation and making connections and getting excited about your work. so if you’re interested in what’s on offer, feel free to register, it’s only $30, and gets you two days and three nights of words, images, performances, food, drinks and people.

Evenings at Serial Space

Each evening at Serial Space there’s a program of performances and exhibitions as part of Open Fields, open to everyone. If you haven’t registered for the whole Open Fields program, it’s $5 at the door to get into the evening shows.

There’s a printable program of Serial Space events, and more detailed information here.

On Thursday night, we’re having a communal dinner for conference participants (it’ll be Indian vegetarian) in conjunction with the Diversity Dinner installation by Emma Konaris. This will take place prior to the evening’s events, from around 6pm.

Superhero vs Evil Scientists – Operation Neuschwanstein

Johnny Amore and MRCVE

Thursday, 29th April, 3.30-5.30pm

Bon Marche Studio (Bldg. 3, Lvl. 1, Rm. 105)

Screening

Starting point of the collaboration between MRCVE and Johnny Amore was approximately fifteen minutes long short movie “Superhero vs. Evil Scientists -On the Bright Cup on the Side”, which was shot in Pori 2007 and has been screened in various places around the world.

In a year 2008 visited MRCVE Munich in search for the lost magic. “Operation Neuschwanstein” was done together with Superhero and it consisted five live performances and a lecture in Munich, a short movie and three live performances in Finland. Later on the short movie has been screened all around Europe and in Amman.

In December 2008 visited performed MRCVE and Johnny Amore, again as a Superhero, in Pori and Hämeenlinna, Finland.

Superhero vs Evil Scientists- Operation Neuschwanstein

Performances by The Messianic Research Centre for Visual Ethics & Johnny Amore

Duration: 28:43 min
TV Format: 4:3 Pal
Ton: Stereo

Cast:

MRCVE
Jussi Matilainen
Janne Rahkila
Simo Saarikoski
Asko Nivala

&
Johnny Amore

Camera: Edward Beierle
Script: MRCVE & Johnny Amore
Edit: Jussi Matilainen

Screenings:

Hotelmariekapel [NL]
Operation Neuschwanstein, Screening, ProArtOrg, Belgrad [SERBIA]
Makan, Amman [JO]
Performancefestival Pori [FI]

Homepages:

www.johnnyamore.de
www.the-superhero.blogspot.com
mvetkeskus.blogspot.com
www.tehdasry.fi/solut/mvet/

Wet Theory

Megan Garrett-Jones

Thursday 29 April, 2010, 10am-12pm

Bon Marche Studio (UTS Bldg.3, Lvl.1, Rm. 105)

This proposal is for a performance work-in-progress showing. The work, ‘Wet Theory’ (working title), currently being developed deals with notions of change and fluidity, and in particular people’s perceptions of change within their environment. For myself, I remember fighting detrimental change to the coastal environment in which I grew up, protesting housing developments on the last few undeveloped “green corridors” on the area’s beaches. Nowadays, owners of beach side properties such as these are contemplating their course of action in light of rising sea levels.

I am currently in the process of making trips to my old home (the South Coast) to document my personal impression of change, and also to locations in which rising sea levels are changing the geography of the area. Individual stories and ‘field trips’ will be recorded and find their first presentation at this showing. These will later provide material for and inform the direction of the work.

A theoretical influence on this project is ‘wet theory’ which I came across in an exhibition/mapping project called Soak  (Mathur/da Cunha, 2009) at the National Gallery of Modern Art in Mumbai. Here the notion of a “wet theory” is used to draw an analogy between experiencing the geography of Mumbai as changeable or “fluid” (in part because of a loss of distinction between land and water that occurs nearly every monsoon season), and the necessity of approaching all knowledge and thinking as changeable and fluid. For instance, how do architects, planners and residents design and inhabit a city in a way that can “soak up” the changing conditions year after year? But also, how can we think about things in a way that can ‘soak’ up a multitude of changes and experiences.

This showing will take on a lecture-performance style. In the spirit of an academic presentation, I will define ‘the field’ in which this work may sit, reviewing a body of related art works and theoretical ideas particularly related to mapping. I will look at the current trends of art as a way to understand our relationship with locality, the palimpsetic nature of maps, and the view of location as a lived and fluid experience.

Sections of the work presented will explore innovative forms that manifest a sense of fluidity. This will include letting a multitude of voices speak through documentation or critical input. It will also involve shifting between forms, e.g. research and issue-based discourse and more ‘entertaining’ performance styles. Still in the development stage, the showing will be a valuable platform to experiment with material and receive feedback. Audiences will receive an insight into performance making processes and be invited to input their own related views and experiences.

Megan Garrett-Jones is an emerging performance maker and occasional writer. She has a Bachelor of Creative Arts in Performance from University of Wollongong and Honours in Performance Studies from the University of Sydney. Megan has explored her interest in inter-disciplinary art practice largely within the collaboration Tiger Two Times, whose work ‘Nature League’ (Melbourne Fringe Festival ‘Hub’, 2009, Tiny Stadiums 2010) draws together elements of installation, sound art and performance. Megan has also worked as a performer and deviser with the group Team Mess and in group and solo works shown at Cab Sav, NightTimes, Quarterbred, and Word in Hand. In 2009 Megan cofounded Bake Sale for Art, an artist run organisation committed to the development of opportunities and support for young and emerging artists. She has had writing published in Realtime + Onscreen and Realtime Online, and is a regular contributor on the Bake Sale for Art blog.

Performance, 20min.

OPEN FIELDS PROGRAM

After hours of scheduling, drinking coffee, typing, wrangling with computers and other technology, we’ve pulled together the program for Open Fields. Hurrah.

Download the program here, or go to the “Program” tab for more detailed information on participants and events. We encourage you to browse the tags on the right to see what fields of interest are emerging, and consider who/what you hope to engage with.

If you’re a participant and you want to change, update or add images to your page, email us and let us know.

Thanks everyone for your patience and excitement about Open Fields – we’re really looking forward to it all, and hope you are too.

PS make sure you register – there’s a limited number of tickets and once we’ve reached capacity that’s it.

Watergevoelschool

Morgan C. Levy

Thursday 29th April, 10am-12pm

Bon Marche Studio (UTS Bldg 3, Lvl. 1, Rm 105)

Screening: 30 mins.

The watergevoelschool is a series of participatory and experimental art projects that focus on critical water and related environmental issues.

In light of climate change and its impacts, countries all over the world are increasingly engaged in information-sharing processes about ‘water control’ – concerning natural water bodies such as rivers and oceans, as well as man-made water management structures such as canals, levees, and dams. The watergevoelschool engages lay-participants in otherwise privileged water issues discussions casually and non-technically through collaborative lessons/events.

Lessons are participatory workshops and events attended by diverse international guests/participants. Lessons are documented in a variety of ways: digital video, photography, audio recordings, and text. Documentations are not traditionally documentary or educational, but instead communicate the experience of the lesson itself, and mock and/or question notions of the official and the expert within the increasingly exclusive and technical sphere of environmental and natural resource fields.

The lessons apply DIY concepts to generate playful explorations and unpretentious presentations of the truly unstructured, undefined, and unofficial experience of ‘natural resource management’. The project aims to draw a general public into critical water resource discourses that usually remain under the public radar.

watergevoelschool: flood safety

On March 13, 2010, I led a primarily Dutch and American group in the exercise of running away from a levee/dike (as though it were breaking), and jumping over irrigation canals/ditches along a major shipping canal that travels through mixed urban/agricultural land outside the port city of Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Holland is known for its impressive water management infrastructure, and currently the U.S. for its lack thereof (e.g. New Orleans). This piece explores the existence of particular water-control structures we know little about and often take for granted (levees/dikes), and that are threatened by climate change in both the U.S. and Holland. “Students” were encouraged to strategize about flood safety best-practices and to participate in filming. Presented here is an interpretive ‘instructional’ film produced from the lesson (approx. 2-3 minutes).

I am a U.S. Fulbright Scholar completing independent research comparing water management and related environmental policy in Holland and California, currently working with the Technische Universiteit Delft and Wageningen University in The
Netherlands.

Information about my research: nontechnicalpublic.blogspot.com, and my art at: www.morganclevy.com. I will enter the University of California at Berkeley’s interdisciplinary graduate Energy & Resources Group this coming fall.

I’m passionate about the integrated, creative exploration of geography, natural resources – particularly water, environmentalism, and art, breaking down the boundaries between these often isolated disciplines, and questioning hierarchies of ‘knowledge’ that exist across these fields.