Archive Page 2

Shiga Plateau Olympics

Dianne Peacock

Serial Space Gallery, Chippendale

Exhibition

Shiga Plateau Olympics

The pasted-on breasts in Martha Rosler’s Body Beautiful or Beauty Knows No Pain series, 1966-1972 and a collage from Eduardo Paolozzi’s Psychological Atlas, 1949, which transforms, with great economy an elephant into a monster are works that make me feel that I am seeing. A common link in my reference projects is the experience of wonder which occurs in their encounter. Guy Sherwin’s Man Holding a Mirror, as performed in Melbourne in 2008; and spaces with internal spatial mystery are also in this category.

Shiga Plateau Olympics is a series of simple collages on a subject of obscure personal interest. It proved useful in isolating specific functional, transformative techniques of this medium.

Dianne Peacock is an architect based in Melbourne, where her Ph.D. entitled Spatial Mystery and Parallel Works is undertaken by project at RMIT. Her practice has produced exhibitions, installations and zines in addition to built and unbuilt work. She teaches architectural design studio and at RMIT developed Paper, Scissors, Blur, a course in collage and mixed media in architecture. In 2009 Dianne established Subplot, a Melbourne based architectural practice.

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Perspective as Preoccupation

Tom Lee

Thursday 29th April, 2010, 3.30-5.30pm

Bon Marche Studio (UTS Bldg. 3, Lvl. 1, Rm. 105)

Presentation, 20m.

Here I take a look at various episodes in the prose fiction of W. G. Sebald where prothesis and practice contribute to perspective. This is part of a broader philosophical argument about what determines a perspective, and how things relate. I make use of the metaphysics of A. N. Whitehead and his “second-coming” in the work of contemporary philosophers of science, and by those in the field of science studies (Bruno Latour, and Isabelle Stengers, most notably).

tomfredlee.wordpress.com

Roisin Murphy: A Preoccupation and Costume

Tom Lee

Friday 30th April, 2010, 3.30-5.30pm

Bon Marche Studio (UTS Bldg. 3, Lvl. 1, Rm. 105)

Presentation, 20mins.

Roisin Murphy: A Preoccupation and Costume

This paper will explain the materialisation of fanatical feelings into a costume worn by the presenter in tribute to the pop-icon Roisin Murphy.

tomfredlee.wordpress.com

Headwater

Chris Caines, Jes Tyrrell, Shannon O’Neill

Thursday 29th April, 2010

From 3.30 – 5.30pm

Bon Marche Studio (UTS, Bldg. 3, Lvl. 1, Rm. 105)

Performance: 30mins

Headwater is a live AV performance by The Field (Chris Caines, Shannon O’Neill & Jes Tyrrell). Building on the performance done as part of Liquid Architecture 09 and Memory Flows at CarriageWorks where The Field used material from Memory Flows artists (via the ABC Pool website) and custom generated sound and vision, the new work in development to be presented in progress at Open Fields will then be presented at the Armoury Olympic Park in mid May. The piece responds to the natural history of that location. Audio and video field recordings of the site and the Parramatta river environs and wider environmental sources combine to provide the source material for a live performance of the sound and image of the landscape itself.


Local Brew Launch

You Are Here (Zanny Begg and Keg de Souza)

Wednesday 28 April

Serial Space, 7pm – 10pm

Publication launch

Local Brew, published by You Are Here (Zanny Begg and Keg de Souza), is a toast to the tiny suburb of Chippendale which grew up in the shadow of a giant brewery. It contains stories from some of the artist run space and bar-flys who made it what it is today.

The publication has been supported by City of Sydney Matching Grants Scheme.

You Are Here seeks moments of engagement between art, activism, revolution and everyday life.

www.youarehere.me

Barbara Guest’s Epistemic Image

Ella O’Keefe

Thursday April 28, 1pm-3pm

Presentation Room: Lvl.5, Rm.510

Presentation: 15mins

This will be a short paper examining some of the work of the contemporary American poet Barbara Guest, drawing on some examples of some of her later poems. Guest’s poetry is highly concerned with aesthetics and the visual realm and Guest like her many of her New York school peers wrote about visual arts in her poetry and collaborated with artists throughout her career. This paper draws on Guest’s early American modernist and Imagist influences before considering how Guest has advanced the operation of image in her own poetry. The images in her poems are complex and dispersed, they open across multiple registers and are highly conscious of the image formation process.

Guest’s epistemic image is one concerned with showing how looking itself occurs and articulating a connection between thought and the visual realm. This suggests an understanding of a poem as a relational participant within a conscious construction of image, being enacted within many simultaneous system of thought and experience. The epistemic image encourages a mode of thinking that is highly conscious of mobility and attentive looking.

Guest’s multi-modal image suggests new possibilities for image-making within and expanded and open-ended compositional field. While at first glance Guest is not a cybernetic of process-oriented poet, the function of image in her work suggests there is a dialogue to be had with some of these approaches.

Ella O’Keefe completed an honours thesis in writing and cultural studies at UTS on the poetry of Barbara Guest in 2009. She has produced radio for The Night Air on Radio National and is a current contributer to Final Draft the books and writing program on 2SER FM.

Closing the Field: Sex, Cook and The Morning After

Katrina Schlunke

Thursday 29th April 10am-12pm

Presentation Room (UTS Bldg. 3, Lvl. 5, Rm. 510)

Presentation: 20 mins

This paper wonders about Tahiti and sex and Captain Cook and so Australia. Cook filled in the missing edge of Australia. In setting down his navigations of the east coast he sealed up a continent, made of it a container and containable or did he? What spills out of this cartographic performance of a closed field? In what ways is it still ‘open’?

Katrina is a Senior Lecturer in Cultural Studies at the University of Technology, Sydney.