Posts Tagged 'body multiple. Actor Network Theory'

Stutter

Michelle Mantsio

Friday 30 April, 2010, from 1 to 3 pm

Presentation Room (UTS Bldg. 3, Lvl. 5, Rm. 510)

Installation: 30mins

Friday 26th June 1997 (past)

Friday 27th June 1997 (correct)

Saturday 29th June 1997 (futural)

Saturday 29th June 1997 (futural-repeat-stutter)

Sunday 29th June 1997 (correct)

Dates from journal entries

Stutter is a project based on an event on Saturday 28th June 1997, which caused a stutter, a fracture generating stickiness through cycles of repetition and return. The stutter that manifested was evidenced through the confusion of time through dates from journal entries (please see above). In the project Stutter, the circumstances surrounding the event are restaged as an installation to explore it as a representation of a non-linear duration of time and what that might allow in terms of understanding a stutter, and why someone gets stuck. The restaging of the event is mediated by the artist, where metaphors are developed as the stutter is restaged through the performative body and constructed apparel to support the body.

This project will be explored through the use of methodologies based on Actor Network Theory (Latour) and the cybernetics of self (Bateson). The research is based on working with a model of Annmarie Mol’s body multiple, where the body is explored and emerges through it’s everyday practices (eg. journal entries). In addition to the theoretical methods, the use of installation as a dialogic form of art is fundamental to the methodology of the research. Installation is employed as an ideal medium, to show the body multiple and relational assemblages, in addition to showing process/method and so hopes to present an exploration of non linear time and reveal the distribution of will as an exploration of affect and embodiment.

Stutter will be presented as an installation consisting of a video and apparel (plus possibly drawings). The video will be based on a restaging of the dates as an animation of a headstand rolling on and off balance. The video will also consist of sound, as a person repeats the dates and once again repeats and errs throughout the process as the image and sound attempt to catch up to one another in these cycles of repetition. The apparel will consist of 2 styles of hand woven hoods, each consisting of a double hood in an attempt to reconstruct the stutter and non-linear duration of memory emerging through the journals. Style 1: The weave will be based on Actor Network Theory and the relational assemblage of numbers from the journal entries of the dates in and surrounding the event (27th to 29th June 1997). Style 2: The weave will be based on Bateson’s cybernetics of self and the distribution of will, but again will use the same primary data from the numbers in the journal entries on these days. Through presenting 2 styles based on the same primary data, yet employing 2 different methodologies, the aim is to use a visual language of pattern, colour, etc to assess any mimic or differentiation between the two and hopefully lead to a further understanding of the stutter.

The project will result in an installation and presentation, where as an experiment that uses art as a methodology of research, the hope is that a further understanding of the stutter as a fracture and the futural impact that this has, may emerge. This will be explored through the attempt to contain all aspects within a site and explore the lateral relational assemblages emerging. In addition the Stutter project aims to explore the potential to present the body multiple, presenting not only the disjuncture, but also the emergence and identification of pattern, and how they may coexist.

Michelle Mantsio’s art practice is cross media, which includes installation, drawing, painting, performance and video. She completed her BFA with Honours and MA in Art in Public Space at RMIT University. She is currently completing a PhD at the Centre for Ideas, VCA, based on tracking the body through pattern and repetition as explored through contemporary art practice.